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Posted by Mike Pegg, reppin' I/O since 2011

Google I/O is almost here! We’ll officially kick-off live from the Moscone Center in San Francisco at 9:30AM PDT this Thursday, May 28th. While we’re putting the finishing touches on the keynote, sessions, sandbox talks, and code labs, we wanted to provide you with some tips to get ready to experience I/O, either in-person or offsite.

Navigate the conference with the Web & Android apps

To get the most out of Google I/O, make sure to download the I/O Android App and/or add the I/O web app to your mobile homescreen (both work offline!). From either, you can plan your schedule, view the venue map, and keep up with the latest I/O details. We just updated the website this morning, optimizing it for real-time content, as well as the Android app on Google Play - make sure to download the latest version (3.3.2) before the conference starts.

Attending in person?

New this year, keynote access will be assigned on a first-come, first-serve basis during badge pickup. Be sure to swing by Moscone West tomorrow, Wednesday, May 27th between 9AM-8PM PDT to pick up your badge (full badge pick-up schedule). Don’t forget to bring your government-issued photo ID and a copy of your ticket (on your phone or a printed copy). If you’re an Academic attendee, please remember to bring proof of eligibility. You might want to read through the pro tips in our FAQ before you arrive to learn how to best navigate the conference.

Last but not least, we’re looking forward to kicking back and relaxing with you at the After Hours party during the evening of Day 1. Expect good food, good drinks, and a few Googley surprises. Be sure to check your email during the event for further instructions.

Attending remotely?

Can’t join us in person? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered! Whether you’re looking to to experience I/O with other devs in your neighborhood, or if you’ll be streaming it live from your couch, here are some ways you can connect with I/O in real-time:

  • I/O Extended: There’s still time to find an I/O Extended event happening near you. We have 460+ events happening in 91+ countries, so your chances of finding one near you are pretty good. These events are organized by Google Developer Groups, Student Ambassadors, and local developers, and include activities such as code labs, hackathons and more.
  • I/O Live: Tune into I/O Live on the web at google.com/io or via the I/O Android app. We will live stream the keynote and all sessions over the course of the event. During breaks, you can watch live interviews happening right from Moscone and educational pre-recorded content. If you want to bring the live stream and/or the #io15 conversation to your audience, simply customize our I/O Live widget and embed it on your site or blog.
  • #io15request: Send us your questions about what’s happening at I/O and a team of onsite Googlers will do their best to track down an answer for you. To submit a request, just make a public post on Google+ or Twitter with the #io15request hashtag. We’ll only be replying to requests made on May 28-29, in English, French or German. Learn more.
  • I/O in photos: Be sure to check out our photo stream during the event. We’ll upload photos in real time, live from Mocone.

We’re looking forward to seeing you in person or remotely on Thursday and Friday. Don’t forget to join the social conversation at #io15!

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Posted by Hillel Maoz, Engineering Lead, Search Console Team and Mariya Moeva, Webmaster Trends Analyst

Originally posted to the Webmaster Central blog

Wouldn’t it be nifty if you could track where your indexed app content shows up in search results, for which queries, which app pages are most popular, and which ones have errors? Yeah, we thought so too! So we’ve equipped our freshly renamed Search Console with new reports to show you how Google understands and treats your app content in search results.

Our goal is to make Search Console a comprehensive source of information for everyone who cares about search, regardless of the format of their content. So, if you own or develop an app, Search Console is your new go-to place for search stats.

Add your app to Search Console

Simply open Search Console and enter your app name: android-app://com.example. Of course, we’ll only show data to authorized app owners, so you need to use your Google Play account to let Search Console know you have access to the app. If you don’t have access to your app in Google Play, ask an owner to verify the app in Search Console and add you next.

Connect your site to your app

Associating your site with your app is necessary for App Indexing to work. Plus, it helps with understanding and ranking the app content better.

Track your app content’s performance in search

The new Search Analytics report provides detailed information on top queries, top app pages, and traffic by country. It also has a comprehensive set of filters, allowing you to narrow down to a specific query type or region, or sort by clicks, impressions, CTR, and positions.

Use the Search Analytics report to compare which app content you consider most important with the content that actually shows up in search and gets the most clicks. If they match, you’re on the right track! Your users are finding and liking what you want them to see. If there’s little overlap, you may need to restructure your navigation, or make the most important content easier to find. Also worth checking in this case: have you provided deep links to all the app content you want your users to find?

Make sure Google understands your app content

If we encounter errors while indexing your app content, we won’t be able to show deep links for those app pages in search results. The Crawl Errors report will show you the type and number of errors we’ve detected.

See your app content the way Google sees it

We’ve created an alpha version of the Fetch as Google tool for apps to help you check if an app URI works and see how Google renders it. It can also be useful for comparing the app content with the webpage content to debug errors such as content mismatch. In many cases, the mismatch errors are caused by blocked resources within the app or by pop-ups asking users to sign in or register. Now you can see and resolve these issues.

To get started on optimizing and troubleshooting your own app, add it to Search Console now. If you want to know more about App Indexing, read about it on our Developer Site. And, as always, you’re welcome to drop by the help forum with more questions.

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Posted by Anthony Maurice, Fun Propulsion Labs at Google

Fun Propulsion Labs at Google* is back with an exciting new release for game developers. We’ve updated Pie Noon (our open source Android game) to add support for Google Cardboard, letting you jump into the action directly using your Android phone as a virtual reality headset! Select your targets by looking at them and throw pies with a flick of the switch.

Look out for incoming pie!

We used the Cardboard SDK for Android, which helps simplify common virtual reality tasks like head tracking, rendering for Cardboard, and handling specialized input events. And you might remember us from before, bringing exciting game technologies like FlatBuffers, Pindrop, and Motive, all of which you can see in use in Pie Noon.

You can grab the latest version of Pie Noon on Google Play to try it out, or crack open the source code, and take a look at how we brought an existing game into virtual reality.

* Fun Propulsion Labs is a team within Google that's dedicated to advancing gaming on Android and other platforms.

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Posted by Mike Pegg, reppin' I/O since 2011

Today we launched the official schedule for Google I/O 2015 at google.com/io. At this year’s event, happening May 28-29 in San Francisco, we’ll host more than 200 talks centered around some important topics which matter to you: Design & Develop, to help you build beautiful, powerful apps; Earn & Engage, where we’ll cover tools to grow your user base and create sustainable, successful businesses; and What’s Next, a peek into Google’s emerging platforms. With just over three weeks until Google I/O, start planning your schedule today!

Start building your schedule

Whether you’re attending in person or virtually, you can get started building your schedule. Don’t worry about converting the start and end times to your local time zone, we’ve taken care of that for you. Simply sign in to the I/O website to add talks directly to “My Schedule.” If you’re using Chrome (on Android or desktop), you can enable notifications for events added to your schedule so that you can be sure to catch them. That way, you won’t miss exciting sessions like Astro Teller’s “Helping Moonshots Survive Contact with the Real World” or an update from the ATAP team on some cool new projects they’re working on. All sessions will be livestreamed, so whether you’re watching from one of the 400 I/O Extended Locations around the world or the comfort of your own desk, we’ve got you covered.

Attending in person

In addition to the traditional breakout sessions, which are livestreamed, if you’re attending in person, you’ll also get a chance to go to more than 100 sandbox talks. These intimate, 20-minute talks are often more technical, and the smaller size means that you’ll get a chance to interact directly with the Googlers teaching them. Together, you can roll up your sleeves and tackle topics ranging from “Memory Performance & Tooling” to “What's new in the Google Play Developer Console.” Most sandbox talks will happen twice throughout the two-day event, so you’ll have more chances to participate.

This year, there are over 100 sandbox talks: intimate, 20-minute technical talks where you can roll up your sleeves and interact directly with Googlers.

Don’t forget to save time in your schedule for a code lab or two. Back by popular demand, these self-paced workshops will showcase a variety of technologies from Google on mobile, wearables, and Cloud to name a few. We’ll provide the workstations and tablets for use on-site - just bring yourself any time during the two days of I/O! If you have your own device, Googlers will be on hand to help you get set up so you can jump into it.

See you soon

We’re getting really excited about Google I/O 2015 and today’s schedule is just a preview of what’s to come. We’ll be adding more sessions, sandbox talks, and events to the schedule as we get closer to I/O. But, we can’t give everything away beforehand. Be sure to check the agenda again after the keynote on Day 1, for those top secret talks. We look forward to connecting with you in-person, at I/O Extended or via I/O Live in a few weeks!

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Posted by Saurabh Gupta, Product Manager

Back in 2014, we introduced add-ons for Google Docs, Sheets, and Forms in developer preview. Since then, the developer community has built a wide variety of features to help millions of Docs, Sheets and Forms users become more productive. Over the last few months, we launched a number of developer-friendly features that made it easier to build, test, deploy and distribute add-ons. Some key capabilities include:

With these features under our belt, we are ready to graduate add-ons out of developer preview. Starting today, any developer can publish an add-on. To ensure users find the best tools for them, every new add-on will undergo a review for adherence to our guidelines before it’s available in the add-ons store.

We can’t wait to see what you will build!

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Posted by William Denniss, Product Manager, Identity and Authentication

Support for ClientLogin, OAuth 1.0 (3LO1), AuthSub, and OpenID 2.0 has ended, and the shutdown process has begun. Clients attempting to use these services will begin to fail and must be migrated to OAuth 2.0 or OpenID Connect immediately.

To migrate a sign-in system, the easiest path is to use the Google Sign-in SDKs (see the migration documentation). Google Sign-in is built on top of our standards-based OAuth 2.0 and OpenID Connect infrastructure and provides a single interface for authentication and authorization flows on Web, Android and iOS. To migrate server API use, we recommend using one of our OAuth 2.0 client libraries.

We are moving away from legacy authentication protocols, focusing our support on OpenID Connect and OAuth 2.0. These modern open standards enhance the security of Google accounts, and are generally easier for developers to integrate with.

13LO stands for 3-legged OAuth where there's an end-user that provides consent. In contrast, 2-legged (2LO) correspond to Enterprise authorization scenarios such as organizational-wide policies control access. Both OAuth1 3LO and 2LO flows are deprecated, but this announcement is specific to OAuth1 3LO.

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Posted by Andrew Nartker, Product Manager, Google Cardboard

All of us is greater than any single one of us. That’s why we open sourced the Cardboard viewer design on day one. And why we’ve been working on virtual reality (VR) tools for manufacturers and developers ever since. We want to make VR better together, and the community continues to inspire us.

For example: what began with cardboard, velcro and some lenses has become a part of toy fairs and art shows and film festivals all over the world. There are also hundreds of Cardboard apps on Google Play, including test drives, roller coaster rides, and mountain climbs. And people keep finding new ways to bring VR into their daily lives—from campus tours to marriage proposals to vacation planning.

It’s what we dreamed about when we folded our first piece of cardboard, and combined it with a smartphone: a VR experience for everyone! And less than a year later, there’s a tremendous diversity of VR viewers and apps to choose from. To keep this creativity going, however, we also need to invest in compatibility. That’s why we’re announcing a new program called Works with Google Cardboard.

At its core, the program enables any Cardboard viewer to work well with any Cardboard app. And the result is more awesome VR for all of us.

For makers: compatibility tools, and a certification badge

These days you can find Cardboard viewers made from all sorts of materials—plastic, wood, metal, even pizza boxes. The challenge is that each viewer may have slightly different optics and dimensions, and apps actually need this info to deliver a great experience. That’s why, as part of today’s program, we’re releasing a new tool that configures any viewer for every Cardboard app, automatically.

As a manufacturer, all you need to do is define your viewer’s key parameters (like focal length, input type, and inter-lens distance), and you’ll get a QR code to place on your device. Once a user scans this code using the Google Cardboard app, all their other Cardboard VR experiences will be optimized for your viewer. And that’s it.

Starting today, manufacturers can also apply for a program certification badge. This way potential users will know, at a glance, that a VR viewer works great with Cardboard apps and games. Visit the Cardboard website to get started.

The GoggleTech C1-Glass viewer works with Google Cardboard

For developers: design guidelines and SDK updates

Whether you’re building your first VR app, or you’ve done it ten times before, creating an immersive experience comes with a unique set of design questions like, “How should I orient users at startup?” Or “How do menus even work in VR?”

We’ve explored these questions (and many more) since launch, and today we’re sharing our initial learnings with the developer community. Our new design guidelines focus on overall usability, as well as common VR pitfalls, so take a look and let us know your thoughts.

Of course, we want to make it easier to design and build great apps. So today we're also updating the Cardboard SDKs for Android and Unity—including improved head tracking and drift correction. In addition, both SDKs support the Works with Google Cardboard program, so all your apps will play nice with all certified VR viewers.

For users: apps + viewers = choices

The number of Cardboard apps has quickly grown from dozens to hundreds, so we’re expanding our Google Play collection to help you find high-quality apps even faster. New categories include Music and Video, Games, and Experiences. Whether you’re blasting asteroids, or reliving the Saturday Night Live 40th Anniversary Special, there’s plenty to explore on Google Play.

New collections of Cardboard apps on Google Play

Today’s Works with Google Cardboard announcement means you’ll get the same great VR experience across a wide selection of Cardboard viewers. Find the viewer that fits you best, and then fire up your favorite apps.

For the future: Thrive Audio and Tilt Brush are joining the Google family

Most of today’s VR experiences focus on what you see, but what you hear is just as important. That’s why we’re excited to welcome the Thrive Audio team from the School of Engineering in Trinity College Dublin to Google. With their ambisonic surround sound technology, we can start bringing immersive audio to VR.

In addition, we’re thrilled to have the Tilt Brush team join our family. With its innovative approach to 3D painting, Tilt Brush won last year’s Proto Award for Best Graphical User Interface. We’re looking forward to having them at Google, and building great apps together.

Ultimately, today’s updates are about making VR better together. Join the fold, and let’s have some fun.

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Posted by Angana Ghosh, Product Manager, Google Fit

Last year, we teamed up with adidas, Polar, and Withings to invite developers to create amazing fitness apps that integrated the new Google Fit platform. The community of Google Fit developers has flourished since then and to help get them inspired, we even suggested a few ideas for new, fun, innovative fitness apps. Today, we’re announcing the twelve grand prize winners, whose apps will be promoted on Google Play.

  • 7MinGym: All you need is this app, a chair, and a wall to start benefiting from 7 minute workouts at home. You can play music from your favorite music app and cast your workout to Chromecast or Android TV.
  • Aqualert: This app reminds you to stay hydrated throughout the day and lets you track your water intake.
  • Cinch Weight Loss and Fitness: Cinch helps you with detailed information your steps taken and calories burned. The app also supports heart-rate tracking with compatible Android Wear devices.
  • FitHub: FitHub lets you track your fitness activity from multiple accounts, including Google Fit, and multiple wearable devices, including Android Wear. You can also add your friends to compare your progress!
  • FitSquad: FitSquad turns fitness into a competition. Join your friends in a squad to compare progress, track achievements, and cheer each other on.
  • Instant - Quantified Self: Instant is a lifestyle app that helps you track not only your physical activity but your digital activity too and tells you how much you’re using your phone and apps.other activity. You can also set usage limits and reminders.
  • Jump Rope Wear Counter: This simple app lets you count your jump rope skips with an Android Wear device.
  • Move it!: This app packs one neat feature – it reminds you to get up and move about if you haven’t been active in the last hour.
  • Openrider - GPS Cycling Riding: Track and map your cycle routes with Openrider.
  • Running Buddies: In this run tracking app, runners can choose to share their runs and stats with those around them so that they can find other runners similar to themselves to go running with.
  • Strength: Strength is a workout tracking app that also lets you choose from a number of routines, so you can get to your workout quickly and track it without manual data entry. Schedules and rest timers come included.
  • Walkholic: Walkholic is another way to see your Google Fit walking, cycling, and running data. You can also turn on notifications if you don’t meet your own preset goals.

We saw a wide range of apps that integrated Google Fit, and both the grand prize winners and the runner ups will be receiving some great devices from our challenge partners to help with their ongoing fitness app development: the X_CELL and SPEED_CELL from adidas, a new Android Wear device, a Loop activity tracker with a H7 heart rate sensor from Polar, and a Smart Body Analyzer from Withings.

We’re thrilled these developers chose to integrate the Google Fit platform into their apps, giving users one place to keep all their fitness activities. With the user’s permission, any developer can store or read the user’s data from Google Fit and use it to build powerful and useful fitness experiences. Find out more about integrating Google Fit into your app.

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Posted by Cheryl Simon Retzlaff, Software Engineer on the Realtime API team

Originally posted to the Google Apps Developer blog

Real-time collaboration is a powerful feature for getting work done inside Google docs. We extended that functionality with the Realtime API to enable you to create Google-docs style collaborative applications with minimal effort.

Integration of the API becomes even easier with a new in memory mode, which allows you to manipulate a Realtime document using the standard API without being connected to our servers. No user login or authorization is required. This is great for building applications where Google login is optional, writing tests for your app, or experimenting with the API before configuring auth.

The Realtime debug console lets you view, edit and debug a Realtime model. To launch the debugger, simply execute gapi.drive.realtime.debug(); in the JavaScript console in Chrome.

Finally, we have refreshed the developer guides to make it easier for you to learn about the API as a new or advanced user. Check them out at https://developers.google.com/drive/realtime.

For details on these and other recent features, see the release note.

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Posted by Jon Simantov, Fun Propulsion Labs at Google

Originally posted to the Google Open Source blog

Fun Propulsion Labs at Google* is back today with some new releases for game developers. We’ve updated Pie Noon (our open source Android TV game) with networked multi-screen action, and we’ve also added some delicious new libraries we’ve been baking since the original release: the Pindrop audio library and the Motive animation system.

Pie Noon multi-screen action

Got an Android TV and up to 4 friends with Android phones or tablets? You’re ready for some strategic multi-player mayhem in this updated game mode. Plan your next move in secret on your Android phone: will you throw at an opponent, block an incoming attack, or take the risky approach and wait for a larger pie? Choose your target and action, then watch the Android TV to see what happens!


We used the NearbyConnections API from the most recent version of Google Play Games services to easily connect smartphones to your Android TV and turn our original Pie Noon party game into a game of turn-based strategy. You can grab the latest version of Pie Noon from Google Play to try it out, or crack open the source code and take a look at how we used FlatBuffers to encode data across the network in a fast, portable, bandwidth-efficient way.

Pindrop: an open source game audio library

Pindrop is a cross-platform C++ library for managing your in-game audio. It supports cross compilation to Android, Linux, iOS and OSX. An early version of this code was part of the first Pie Noon release, but it’s now available as a separate library that you can use in your own games. Pindrop handles loading and unloading sound banks, tracking sound locations and listeners, prioritization of your audio channels, and more.

Pindrop is built on top of several other pieces of open source technology:

  • SDL Mixer is used as a backend for actually playing the audio.
  • The loading of data and configuration files is handled by our serialization library, FlatBuffers.
  • Our own math library, MathFu, is used for a number of under-the-hood calculations.

You can download the latest open source release from our GitHub page. Documentation is available here and a sample project is included in the source tree. Please feel free to post any questions in our discussion list.

Motive: an open source animation system

The Motive animation system can breathe life into your static scenes. It does this by applying motion to simple variables. For example, if you’d like a flashlight to shine on a constantly-moving target, Motive can animate the flashlight so that it moves smoothly yet responsively.

Motive animates both spline-based motion and procedural motion. These types of motion are not technically difficult, but they are artistically subtle. It's easy to get the math wrong. It's easy to end up with something that moves as required but doesn't quite feel right. Motive does the math and lets you focus on the feeling.

Motive is scalable. It's designed to be extremely fast. It also has a tight memory footprint -- smaller than traditional animation compression -- that's based on Dual Cubic Splines. Our hope is that you might consider using Motive as a high-performance back-end to your existing full-featured animation systems.

This initial release of Motive is feature-light since we focused our early efforts on doing something simple very quickly. We support procedural and spline-based animation, but we don't yet support data export from animation packages like Blender or Maya. Motive 1.0 is suitable for props -- trees, cameras, extremities -- but not fully rigged character models. Like all FPL technologies, Motive is open source and cross-platform. Please check out the discussion list, too.

What’s Fun Propulsion Labs at Google?

You might remember us from such Android games as Pie Noon, LiquidFun Paint, and VoltAir, and such cross-platform libraries as MathFu, LiquidFun, and FlatBuffers.

Want to learn more about our team? Check out this recent episode of Game On! with Todd Kerpelman for the scoop!


* Fun Propulsion Labs is a team within Google that's dedicated to advancing gaming on Android and other platforms.